The New AdWords Interface

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In a few days, it’ll be July (can you believe that?!) and with that we’ll be in the third quarter. You’re probably thinking now about third quarter goals for your business, and one you should add, is monitoring your Google AdWords account to see if it’ll be switching to the new interface next month.

According to a recent article from Search Engine Land, there’s a chance that the new AdWords interface will be coming to your account this July. Google first announced the new interface two years ago. The Search Engine Land article reports some advertisers have already received notifications from Google that their accounts will switch to the new interface next month. Once the new interface is here, advertisers will not be able to switch back, and some features and reports will not be available in the new AdWords experience. Google will send email notifications before they switch over accounts.

Search Engine Land writes that this switch will not happen overnight, but by the end of the October everyone will be on this new interface. Google has promised it will not change people’s interfaces during November or December.

The article advises that users should learn the new interface as soon as they can. Although Search Engine Land writes that the new interface will be intuitive, it will still be learning curve either way.

Don’t be afraid to contact Sperling Interactive with any of your AdWords questions. We’re available at (978) 304-1730 and info@sperlinginteractive.com.

Why ADA Compliant Websites Are So Important + How To Make Your Site Compliant

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ADA is an acronym that stands for Americans With Disabilities and it became a law in 1990. This act prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in any area of public life. In January 2018, new federal regulations were put into effect requiring all federal institutions’ websites to be meet AA compliance on all items.

Even if you aren’t a federal regulation, It’s been that more and more ADA compliance lawsuits are winning in court. With most people owning a smartphone and other mobile devices, it’s not a surprise that many of today’s discrimination cases are trickling into the digital world.

Today, any business that is considered a “public accommodation” must have an ADA compliant website. The most common types of businesses people considered to be a “public accommodation” include B2C businesses, retail, or any type of business the public could easily access. We at Sperling Interactive believe that even if you have a B2B business, you should still have an ADA compliant website. This will make you more SEO friendly, and also, who doesn’t want to accessible to all web users?

Other Reasons Why You Should Care

According to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, more than 1 in 8 Americans have a disability, making them the largest minority group in our country. We’re in the era of the Internet, but that doesn’t ensure everything online is user-friendly for those with disabilities. Another fact from the Pew Research Center is disabled Americans are less likely to be found online. About a quarter of Americans with a disability say they never use the Internet. Disabled adults are 20% less likely to own a traditional computer, smartphone, or tablet. Groups of people who will be impacted by a non-compliant website include but are not limited to  individuals who have impairments with visuals, motor skills, hearing, communication, learning, and cognition.  

How Do I Make My Website ADA Compliant?

Your site probably already has some of the items for an ADA compliance website checked off, but here are some important fixes to make that are a bit more complex .

-The text must meet a minimum contrast ratio against the background.
-Website visitors must be able to navigate the site through their keyboard only.

-Those with a visual impairment must be able navigate with a screen reader software.

-Your website must handle text scaling up to 200% without causing horizontal scrolling or content-breaking layout issues.   

Contact Sperling Interactive today to see how we can make your website accessible for anyone!  

Why Call Tracking Is Important

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Think phone calls are passé in today’s digital world? Think again! These days, marketers are relying on call tracking to optimize their digital advertising efforts.

What is calling tracking?

Call tracking, also known as call analytics, call attributions, and call intelligence, is a form of marketing analytics technology. It helps businesses measure the calls they receive from their websites and pay-per-click campaigns.

Why call tracking works

Phone calls lead to buys. After people engage with a business’ online content, what can push them to buy from that business is a phone call with them. It makes sense. When people make a call, their intent to buy is generally higher and they’re typically further along in the customer-purchasing journey.  Phone calls give them a chance to interact with the company, gain more information from them through asking questions, and ultimately determine if they trust the company.

Call tracking can teach you what keywords are working. The phone calls you receive will tell you a lot about how your campaign is going. If people start calling, asking for a service or product you don’t offer or make, you’ll know that you’ll have to add some more keywords to your negative keyword list and re-adjust your landing pages so you don’t misrepresent your business. In turn, this can improve your search engine optimization.

Call tracking can let marketers know when people are calling. By knowing what times people are calling your business, marketers can better run campaigns and divy up their budgets better so more clicks lead to phone calls.

Call tracking records phone calls. This can be beneficial for businesses as it lets them know how they’re communicating with potential clients and customers and ways in which they can approve. It also teaches them more about their target audience so they can continue to better their marketing and sales tactics and evolve their business.

Call tracking can track outbound calls, too. Outbound calls are just as important as inbound calls. Calling tracking can help you see how your correspondence with a potential customer or client is panning out.

Call tracking can help you see how your marketing efforts are going. With call tracking, you can really see how your marketing efforts are working and what marketing tactics are bringing in leads and conversions because of the data it provides. From there, you’ll know what marketing efforts to spend less time and money on.

Are you interested in installing call tracking for your website and digital marketing campaigns. Call Sperling Interactive today at (978) 304-1730.

The Four Types Of Keywords

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The key to successfully nailing organic search and paid search is keywords. Bidding on the right keywords will allow you to pop up in the search queries your target audience is using. Google and SEO professionals say there are four different types of keywords, and they are worth checking out as they can boost your traffic and relevant clicks.

Broad

Broad keywords are considered by many as the default keyword type. Broad keywords will give you the widest reach. They will match to search queries that have misspellings, synonyms, related searches, words out of order, and anything else that Adwords deems relevant. You want to be careful with broad keywords, though. While they can help you receive a lot of clicks, you want to make sure you’re not getting irrelevant clicks. Always monitor your campaigns and analytics, and make a list of negative keywords as you go along.

Broad Match

Broad match modifier are keywords that have a ‘+’ in front of the keyword. Important to note – you don’t have to put a ‘+’ in front of every word in the query, and the order of the words does not matter. Broad match are right in the middle when it comes to the four types of keywords and can perform pretty strongly. Through the plus sign, you can have better control of where your ads pop up by locking individual words.

Phrase

Phrase keywords are keywords that are put in quotations. For a search query to match a phrase keyword, it must contain all the words, or at least close variants, in the same order without any words in between, with additional words before or after. Close variants include misspellings, singular and plural words, acronyms, stemmings, abbreviations, and accents.

Exact

Exact keywords have the lowest reach, but the highest relevance. Exact keywords are put in brackets. Only ads that match the keywords exactly will pop up.

Need help choosing keywords for organic and paid search? Sperling Interactive would love you to identify the right keywords for your organization.

What Is Market Segmentation

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What is market segmentation?

Market segmentation is a type of marketing where you target specific groups of people. When you do market segmentation, you essentially put your target audience into groups and create specific campaigns geared towards each group. There are four types of market segmentation: geographic segmentation, demographic segmentation, psychographic segmentation, and behavioral segmentation.

Why is market segmentation important?

When you use market segmentation, you show your diverse audience that you respect them because you’re coming at them with marketing that they resonate with. You’re showing you know that even in subgroups, not everyone in your target audience is the same and you hear all of your target audience’s needs and concerns. You basically win over people by not generalizing groups of people.

Geographic segmentation

Geographic segmentation is when you create a specific marketing strategy for people within a certain area. Businesses that really benefit from using geographic segmentation are ones that serve a specific community, sell seasonal products, or companies that just opened a store in a new territory.

Demographic segmentation

Demographic segmentation is a hyper-focused approach. It’s when you target people based on their age, gender, race, religion, family size, ethnicity, income, and/or level of education. This type of market segmentation is favorable for businesses where their audience is a certain demographic.

Psychographic segmentation

Psychographic segmentation is when you market to people based on their personalities. Our personalities are influenced by our values, morals, interests, hobbies, and lifestyle. Psychographic segmentation is another hyper-focused market segmentation. Retail, publishing, and travel are three industries that should use psychographic segmentation.

Behavioral segmentation

Behavioral segmentation deals with consumers’ buying habits. Consumers’ purchases, money, time, and lifestyle all make up this marketing strategy.  With this market segmentation, get into your consumer’s head before you take action. When does your target audience most need you.

Let’s say you own a card company, for instance. You’re most profitable during Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, and the holidays. The slowest time of the year is August as it’s summertime and there are no holidays. You want to make sure you’re doing the big bulk of your behavioral segmentation marketing during the end of January, the beginning of May, the beginning of June, and the end of November. You don’t want to wait to close to these holidays to start your marketing campaigns as you’ll lose people. With behavioral segmentation, it’s all about reaching your target audience before they make a decision.  

After reading this blog post, do you feel you need help marketing to your target audience? Contact Sperling Interactive today for a plan of action! At Sperling Interactive, we’re all about stretching your marketing dollars further.

 

How To Eliminate Click Fraud In Your PPC Campaign

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Spam or fraudulent clicks can be a leading reason why businesses and nonprofits don’t utilize Google Adwords to promote themselves. It’s an understandable reasoning for a organization to have if they don’t have much knowledge of pay-per-click campaigns. Spam and fraudulent clicks can occur, but they can also be avoided. Continue reading to learn solutions on how to cut down on the amount of spam and fraudulent clicks you receive.

 What are fraudulent clicks?

Fraudulent clicks generally come from competitors and ad publishers looking to get something from your ads. Competitors will repeatedly click on ads to cap out your daily budgets and ad displayers are clicking on ads to give themselves more money. For years, search engines didn’t do much about this, but now they are.

What Google is doing

Of the search engines, Google is doing to the most to decrease fraudulent clicks. Google has created filters to detect fraud and prevent advertisers from wasting money. Google also has Google’s Ad Traffic Quality Team, which manually analyzes clicks before the advertiser is charged, and they investigate when you file a report of invalid clicks. If you use Google Adwords, you can block IP addresses with their feature, IP Exclusions.

How to run your own investigation?

Three things you’ll need are the IP address, click timestamp, and action timestamp. If you see a lot of clicks from a particular IP address and no conversion, there’s a high chance they were fraud clicks.

It might not be fraud

It’s important to note that not every questionable click is fraud. You may just need to adjust your ad targeting. Your targeting could be so broad, which is why you’re receiving a lot of clicks but not a lot of conversions.  

Do you need help running an effective pay-per-click campaign? Call Sperling Interactive at 978-304-1730. We can help stretch your marketing dollars further.

Does Your Organization Need An App?

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We’ve blogged before about the importance of being mobile-friendly. There are two ways businesses and nonprofits can be mobile friendly: either on the mobile web or with an app. It may seem like every organization under the sun has an app these days, but we’re here to tell you it isn’t necessary for everyone. Read on to see if your organization could use an app.

If You Want A Feature That Can’t Be Implemented On The Web
Websites are there to deliver your organization’s mission, services, and location, but when you want to give your audience an experience, an app might be the way to go because there are certain features you can’t implement through your website (e.g. a camera, geolocation, biometrics, sensors, etc.).

You Want To Improve Your Customer Experience.
Apps are widely successful for retail companies. You can do so much with an app if you manage a store. If you run one, your app can be used to display your products, send coupons, inform customers about sales, and start a loyalty rewards program. An app can really improve your relationship with your customers.

You Want To Have An Interactive Gaming Experience.
Gaming is another feature that works better through an app than it does on a website. A popular game on app these days is Geocaching, a scavenger hunt-type game. You can use Geocaching to tell your organization’s story. Through it, you’ll have users travel to different locations to unlock new stories.

Your App Idea Has A Delivery Element To It.
If your company is in the food industry, a delivery app is a must. It’ll help you stay on top of competition and give your customers instant gratification.

Have you been thinking about an app for your business or nonprofit? Sperling Interactive is experienced with app development and would love to help you! Contact us today at (978) 304-1730.

The Most Important Tools Your Website Should Have

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If you’re about to launch a new website, there are certain tools you will need to get the most out of your website and digital marketing efforts. It’s what we like to call our  website launch Checklist. Check it out to see if you have everything you need before your site goes live.

Set up Google Analytics

Google Analytics is a tool that will unveil who is visiting your site. Through it, you can find out who is visiting your site, how the visitors are getting to your site, and where the visitors are coming from, geographically speaking.

Set up Google Tag Manager

Google Tag Manager should be used in conjunction with Google Analytics to collect more data. Tags are snippets of code you can add to your site to track numerous things including scroll tracking, monitoring form submissions, remarketing, or tracking how people arrived to your site. Google Tag Manager is easy to use and simplifies the process of working with tags. Businesses of any size can benefit from Google Tag Manager as it enables you to add and edit tags without a developer.

Set up Google Search Console

Google Search Console can tell you who is linking to you, if there is malware or other problems on your site, and which keyword queries your site is appearing for in search results.

Set up Yoast SEO if you’re using WordPress

This plugin is one of the most downloadable plugins of all time. Through this free plugin, you are able to add an SEO title, meta description, and meta keywords to each post and page of your site. You’re also able to include social sharing information. What’s great about SEO by Yoast is that it analyzes your focus keywords, checks your word count, and evaluates your meta description, images, slug, links, and page title so you’re able to edit those bits easily.   

Have a custom 404 page

A 404 page is the web page user goes to when they’ve mis-typeda URL or have a broken link. You’ll want to build a custom 404 page to your business or nonprofit and helps redirect users.

Need more help understanding these tools? Contact Sperling Interactive today!

What You Need To Know About The 2018 Social Media Algorithms

 

 

 

 

 

 

This year, three of the biggest social media platforms – Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn – changed their algorithms. When a social media platform changes its algorithm, this means it has changed the way it lists posts in its users’ news feeds. Algorithms change all the time and for numerous reasons, thus here’s what you need to know about today’s current ones so you can stay visible in your target audiences’ news feeds.

 

Facebook

Since January 2018, Facebook has begun to prioritize posts that generate conversations, especially those from users’ friends and family members. Facebook is trying to have their users engage in more person-to-person interactions than person-to-brand interactions. They are doing this because they’ve noticed that users spend more time on their platform when they are engaging with posts created by other users. To reach more people via Facebook, create content that will engage your target audience and illicit a response (e.g. comment, share, and react). Additionally, you might want to consider boosting posts you really care about and running Facebook ads.

Instagram

Facebook bought Instagram in 2012, and this year it also made changes to Instagram’s algorithm. Like Facebook, Instagram also rewards content with high engagement. Not only that, Instagram loves it when its users experiment with its features. What’s really big with Instagram right now is Instagram Stories, which currently has 300 million daily users. When you play around with the Instagram Stories features like its filters, polls, and the ‘swipe up’ option, you also boost engagement with your followers.

LinkedIn

Of the three social media platforms, LinkedIn is the least social one, as it geared toward connecting professionals. LinkedIn does prioritize posts that receive engagement, but it also focuses on content that offers value. Whatsmore, LinkedIn has a spam filter, so every time you upload something to LinkedIn, even an image, a bot decides whether the content is spam, low-quality, or clear. So whenever you’re about to share an industry article to LinkedIn, make sure you fact check it.

Do you need help generating social media content? At Sperling Interactive, we can help you spread your message in a way that aligns with the new algorithms.

Facebook Metrics Glossary

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In January, Facebook changed its news feed algorithm. From now on, Facebook is going to prioritize posts from users’ friends and family members over brands’ posts. Because of this change, it is now more important than ever before to start utilizing Facebook ads to promote your business or nonprofit. But what do all the metrics on the Facebook dashboard even mean? In our final blog post in our glossary series, we’ll be defining Facebook ad metrics.

Frequency – This is how many times an ad was shown to a specific user over the selected time period. Depending on your goals, you may want to keep the frequency up or down. Our benchmark tends to be between 1-5 for frequency count. If you get closer to ten, you start to flood users’ news feeds and might overdo it, resulting in them opting out from seeing your ads or unfollowing your page.

Reach Reach is the total amount of users to whom your ad has been shown.

Impressions – Impressions is the grand total of times your ad was shown in a user’s news feed.

Button Clicks – This metric shows how many times someone physically clicked the “Learn More” or “Sign Up” button on your ad. If you have a lead gen ad, you would want this number to be high, but if you are pushing awareness ads or services, having a low button click is okay as long as the link clicks (see below) are producing the results you want.

Link Clicks – A link click is when someone clicks the visible link in your ad.

Clicks (All) – This incorporates all the clicks on your ad, whether it be to your Facebook page, link in copy, button, or when someone engages with your ad by commenting or liking your content.

If you liked this post, be sure to check out our blog posts on pay-per-click glossary guides.
How To Understand Google Analytics
Metrics To Know & Understand For Pay-Per-Click Campaigns
How To Understand Google Adwords