Google’s Biggest Search Algorithms

In September 2002, Google announced it made its first change to its search algorithm. 

At the time, a number of Internet commentators predicted this as the death of PageRank (the name for Google’s system for ranking pages) and a decline in the quality of Google’s search results. 

To an SEO marketer today, that is comical as Google makes thousands of changes every year to its algorithm to improve its user experience. Most of these changes are so minor they can go completely unnoticed. 

However, every now and then, Google rolls out a major algorithm that significantly impact search results. Today we’re breaking down Google’s biggest algorithms throughout the years.

Boston Update

In February 2003, the Boston update became the first named Google update. It was named at SES Boston, an engineering science conference put on by Northeastern University. Google’s initial goal was to change its algorithm every month. It soon changed that goal to day-to-day changes. It’s last monthly update was Esmeralda and it came out in June 2003.

Cassandra

In April 2003, Google announced the Cassandra update, which cracked down on link spam. It focused on mutual links between co-owned websites as well as hidden text and hidden links.

Dominic

In May 2003, the Dominic update came about. It affected the ways backlinks were counted.

Florida

Florida was announced in November 2003. It was a game changer in that it completely destroyed the the value of 1990s SEO tactics and started a new era of search engine optimization. Marketers learned they would have to constantly learn about Google in order to retain organic search rankings. Businesses realized SEO could be a full-time job. A big thing Florida cracked down on was keyword stuffing.

Bourbon

In May 2005, the Bourbon update came about to improve the filtering of spam from SERP (search engine result page). It focused on duplicate content, irrelevant links, and links with less credibility.

Jagger

In September 2005, Google announced Jagger and rolled out the Jagger update in three stages. One in September, one in October, and one in November. It negatively impacted duplicate content across multiple domains, hidden text, redirects, and cloaking (cloaking is when content presented to search engines is different than the content presented to a user’s browser).

Vince

Vince is an algorithm update that came out in February 2009. Google called it a minor change, but some SEO commentators believe it was major. Many big name brands started appearing for broad-level, high volume keyword searches. SEO professionals presumed the reason brands were doing well organically is because they tend to generate a lot of links from external sites and get a lot mentions from the media. An accumulation of news, social media, and blogs provided the trust signals for a relevant first-page ranking.

Caffeine

On August 10, 2009, Google introduced Caffeine. It brought about faster crawling, an expansion of indexing, and near-real-time integration of indexing and ranking. Caffeine’s focus was determining reputation and authority, and returning more relevant results quicker. 

Caffeine provides 50 percent fresher search results, and has the largest collection of web content Google has ever offered.  It wasn’t so much an algorithm update but a new way Google began indexing websites.

Panda

Panda came out on February 23, 2011. This algorithm is focused on reducing low-quality, thin content in search results and instead rewarding compelling, unique content. This algorithm assigns each page a quality classification.  Panda cracked down on spam and high ad-to-content ratio. The Panda update was a response to the growing number of complaints in the search community that low-quality content sites rank higher than high-quality sites with positive user experiences.

Above The Fold/Top Heavy

On January 19, 2012, Google rolled out Above The Fold/Top Heavy. Just like it sounds, this algorithm impacted page layout, in particular above the fold layout. Above the fold is the section of a webpage that is visible without scrolling. 

Above The Fold/Top Heavy targeted websites with too many static ads above the fold. Essentially these ads would force users to scroll down the page to see content. Google found websites with an excess supply of ads gave users a poor user experience. In March 2017, Google’s Gary Illyes confirmed this algorithm still plays a big role in search results.

Penguin

Penguin, also known as the web spam algorithm update, came out on April 24, 2012. Penguin targeted websites that practiced manipulative link building. The websites impacted by Penguin did blackhat techniques.

Pirate

On August 10, 2012, Google announced it would start penalizing websites with repeat copyright infringements. This algorithm update was called ‘Pirate’ among SEO commentators.

Exact Match Domain Algorithm

Exact Match Domain Algorithm was released on September 27, 2012 and it impacted exact match domain names. This algorithm targeted poor quality websites with exact match domain names. What made these sites poor was their thin content offered little to no value to users. 

Payday Loan Algorithm

The Payday Loan Algorithm rolled out on June 11, 2013. This algorithm targeted questionable industries like super high interest loans and payday loans. Payday loans, debt consolidation sites, casinos, pharmaceuticals, non-bank loan companies, and insurance companies were affected along with spammy search queries.

Pigeon

Pigeon was created for local searches and it was released on August 20, 2013. Pigeon aimed to offer better local search results for local businesses. Google enhanced hundreds of ranking signals for both Google search and Google Maps.

Hummingbird

Hummingbird entered the world on September 27, 2013. Hummingbird’s aim was to get better at understanding context when it comes to search queries as it noticed users’ searches were becoming more conversational. It was a predecessor for BERT. 

Hummingbird marked a huge advancement in Google’s search technology. It impacted 90% of searches worldwide. Hummingbird has three focuses: conversational search, human search, and the foundations of voice search. During the early days of the Internet, it was hard for Google to find what you were searching for. Hummingbird focused on synonyms and theme-related topics.

RankBrain 

RankBrain is a machine-learning artificial intelligence system that helps Google sort through search results. It goes through billions of pages and deems what is most relevant to a search query. RankBrain went live on April 2015, but wasn’t introduced to the world until October 2015. SearchEngineLand believes RankBrain is a part of Hummingbird’s search algorithm. So RankBrain is not so much an algorithm, but an important signal for Hummingbird. In fact, it’s the third most influential ranking factor.

Mobilegeddon

Having a mobile friendly website became important on April 21, 2015 as Google dropped Mobilegeddon that day.  This algorithm was coined by Search Engine Land. The algorithm gave a boost to mobile-friendly pages in Google’s mobile search results.

Possum

Possum was never announced nor confirmed by Google, but it supposedly impacts Google My Business listings. It positively affected businesses outside of a city’s limits. Prior to Possum, businesses not technically within a city’s limits had a difficult time ranking well for those keywords. For example, a general contractor in Somerville that does a lot of work in Boston would not show for searches like ‘contractors in Boston’ even though Somerville is close to the city and makes up the Greater Boston area.

Intrusive Interstitial Penalty

Intrusive interstitial penalty was announced in August of 2016. Content that is not easily accessible to users using mobile search would not rank as highly.

Fred

The ‘Fred’ update happened in March of 2017. Its purpose is to crack down on sites that prioritize monetization over user experience. Websites with low quality user engagement, thin content, content heavily geared toward conversions, and UX barriers (pop ups, navigational obstacles, etc.) were all impacted.

At Sperling Interactive, we’re focused on staying ahead of the curve when it comes to SEO. We understand providing users with the best experience possible is what helps keep businesses visible in search. If you’d like help appearing organically, give us a call at (978) 304-1730.  Or check out our popular SEO seminar on December 12th.

Non-Keyword Related Things That Hurt SEO

A graphic of a smartphone and laptop with with analytics on their screens.

For many non-search engine marketing professionals, they’re often told keywords are the most important component of SEO. But over recent years, having a website that offers a positive user experience has been proven to be more important than relevant keywords. There are many things that impact positive user experience and below are twelve things that hurt SEO.

The Site Isn’t ADA Compliant

ADA stands for The Americans with Disabilities Act. The act was established in 1990 and it prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including the Internet. 

For a website to be ADA compliant, people with disabilities must be able to read and understand the content on the site. This means a transcript for audio-only media and closed captions on videos. Website ADA compliance also includes page contrast, the placing of descriptive text behind images, and organizing the site in a way that is easy for screen readers to access the content in a logical way. A site that isn’t ADA compliant hurts SEO because the site isn’t accessible to everyone.

If you want to learn more about ADA compliance, be sure to check out the seminar we are presenting in October at the Enterprise Center.

There’s No Blog Or Blog Posts

A blog is another thing that provides sites with a positive user experience and by not having one can it can hurt SEO. 

Blogs provide  positive user experience because they help build brand trust. Regular blog posts give sites fresh content, and by not utilizing one, it can give users the impression your site hasn’t been updated in a long time. 

Another way blogs improve SEO is you’re able to rank for long-tail keywords. Longer, more specific keywords are good for businesses that are small and have big name brands as competitors. Half of all searches are for terms that are four words or longer.

Thirdly, a quality blog gives sites more reasons to link back to your site.

No Social Media Posts

Just like with blogging, by not being active with social media you are hurting your SEO. An active and engaged social media presence sends search engines the signal you have good authority. Additionally, social sharing drives traffic to your website and social media profiles rank in search engines.

Slow Page Speed

With positive user experience in mind, slow page speed greatly hurts SEO. In today’s instant gratification world, people are impatient and want information fast. A slow page speed also means search engines can’t crawl as many pages.

Technical Errors

Technical errors like broken links and missing pages hurt SEO. You don’t want people coming to your site only to find the thing they need is broken.  You can use Google Search Console to see if there are any technical issues with your site.

No SSL Certificate  

Naturally, Google prefers sending users to trusted sites. Standing for secure sockets layer, an SSL certificate creates higher consumer confidence and encrypts form data. You can tell your site has an SSL certificate by looking up at your address box and seeing if you have ‘https’ in your URL. Last year, Google started labeling HTTP sites as “not secure.”

Spam Comments

Spam comments are something every blog deals with, and unfortunately it can hurt SEO. Spam comments hurt SEO because Google considers where your site links to as a strong indication of what kind of site you are. The comments discredit you and impact your site’s authority. Be sure to always monitor your comments so you can avoid looking spammy. And remember, it’s your site and you can decide whether those comments appear. 

Poor Spelling & Grammar

You know how you can tell you’ve received a spam email by its poor spelling and grammar alone, well search engines are also wary of sites with these mistakes. According to Search Engine Land, sites with higher ranked pages tend to have less spelling mistakes and grammatical errors than lower ranked sites.

Too Many Page Links

Pages with too many links are not user-friendly. When you have too many links, you give Google the impression your content isn’t valuable and you’re trying to stir users to somewhere else. Always make sure your links are relevant and are not going to distract users from the content on the original page.

Duplicate Content

Google loves original content and sees duplicate content as a shortcut. When updating your site or adding new pages, double check that a significant amount of content is not anywhere else on your site. If you have some duplicate content on your website because it is useful for users, put ‘no index’ or ‘no follow’ on those pages so that they don’t hurt your SEO.

At Sperling Interactive, all of our work is aimed at creating positive user experiences. Whether we built your website or not, we can optimize your site for search engines and provide positive user experiences. To learn more about the work we do, give us a call at (978) 304-1730.

How To Optimize Your Landing Page

I spoke to a colleague recently that works for a corporate company as a loan originator. They mentioned having a landing page through their company and were looking for ways to better optimize their page, both from a conversion perspective and an SEO perspective. In today’s blog post, we’ll be breaking down what a landing page is, what  landing page optimization is, and how to optimize your landing page for both conversions and SEO.

What Is A Landing Page?

Sometimes referred to as a capture page, destination page, or a static page, a landing page is a standalone page web users are brought to after clicking on a search result, online ad, or the link in an eblast, newsletter, or social media post. Landing pages educate, encourage, and attract. Lead generation is the most common goal of a landing page.

Below are screenshots of landing pages we’ve created.

The landing page for Destination Salem's free travel guides.

The Cape Cod landing page for SunPower by BlueSel.

 

The contact section from BlueSel's landing page.

 

A landing page for the nonprofit, Bridgewell.

 

The section of Bridgwell's landing page that describes their services.

 

The 'Request More Information' section from Bridgewell's landing page.

 

The landing page for Be Better Now.

 

The testimonial and special offer from the Be Better Now landing page.  

What Is Landing Page Optimization? 

Landing page optimization is the process of enhancing or improving each element on your landing page to increase conversions and improve SEO. The biggest reason why landing pages fail is they don’t meet their audience’s needs. Unintuitive design, non-descriptive or misleading headlines, unrecognizable calls-to-action are all contributing factors. 

To work effectively, landing pages need to be curated for a specific audience and have a clear call-to-action. In today’s digital world, landing pages are often the first exchange people have with a business. They most often offer users something in return for their contact information, and we highly recommend businesses apply that to theirs to offer value. These offers are usually ebooks, subscription to the organization’s newsletter, or a free trial of a product.

If a landing page is meant to be read or convert, a good bounce rate is 60%-80%. If your goal is to drive traffic or have the user visit multiple web pages, a healthy bounce rate would be between 30%-60%.

Optimized landing pages can improve the overall ranking of the website they are on and can give more insights to Google on what your organization is about.

How To Optimize Landing Pages For Conversions 

Use Your Data

As we said before, the biggest reason why landing pages flop is they fail to meet their target audience’s needs. Design your landing pages based on the information you already have about your audience. Be sure to use the information you have of your audience from your website. It’s important to note that you make the most improvements to your landing pages by pushing them live and then making tweaks as insights and data come in about your audience.

Limit the Number of Calls-To-Actions 

You don’t want to overwhelm web users. Stick with one call-to-action and keep your text limited. People only read 20% of the content on a webpage so long sentences and paragraphs don’t work well. Just have the bare necessities.

Have Consistency

You need to make sure the messaging, design, and tone matches the search result, ad, social media post, or newsletter that brings visitors to the landing page. You want your page to match the expectations the visitor had based on their previous interaction.

Write A Catchy Headline

The amount of time it takes you to create a landing page is the amount of time it  should take you to think about the headline. Your headline is just as important, if not more important, than your landing page itself. Because no one’s going to click to your page if there’s no incentive to leave the page they are on. 

Keep The Most Important Information Above The Fold

The term ‘above the fold’ comes from the newspaper world. Digital folds are the points at which the user must scroll to gain more information.

Put In Testimonials

Testimonials help build trust. They are proof people love your business and they can also let visitors determine if they are the right fit to work with you.

How To Optimize Landing Pages For SEO

Have A Custom URL

A custom URL containing certain keywords can make the page more alluring for search engines. Make sure the main keyword for your page is in your URL.

Determine Relevant Keywords

Keywords are the words that you want search engines to rank your page for. You can do a Google search or use Search Console to determine the best keyword for your landing page.

Strategically Place Your Keywords

Once you determine your keywords, you’re going to want to place them strategically on your landing page. The areas you should consider are title tags, meta description, and your copy.

Have A Fast Page

Page speed has never been more important. We see fast page speed as one of the six pillars that makes up SEO. People will X out of your landing page fast if the page load is slow.

Don’t Do Once & Forget


SEO requires ongoing work. Check out this blog post we published back in May to learn why. As such, you want to make sure you use Google Analytics and Google Search Console once a month to see how your landing page is performing and how it can be better optimized. These two tools can inform you what people are searching for to find your landing page, how long users stay on the page, and if there are any technical issues with the page that need fixing.

At Sperling Interactive, we are masters at crafting optimized landing pages for conversions and SEO. We’d be happy to perform an audit of your landing page and give you feedback on how to improve it. We can also create a landing page for you and run a campaign around it. Give us a call at (978) 304-1730 to learn more about us and how we can serve you.

Why SEO Is An Ongoing Service Instead Of A One Time Service

A person using their laptop to look at Analytics.

SEO, short for search engine optimization, refers to optimizing your website so it appears in the search results of search queries related to your business or nonprofit.

A common misconception about SEO is it’s often seen as a one-time service. However, like most things, SEO needs continuous work and maintenance in order for it to deliver the best results.

Here’s why SEO is an ongoing service instead of a one-time service.

Search Engines’ Algorithm Changes

The biggest argument for why SEO needs to be an ongoing service is search engines change their algorithm hundreds of times a year. Moz, an SEO software company, believes Google changes its search algorithm 500-600 a times a year! If that’s not much of an argument for why SEO is an ongoing service, we don’t know what is?

Technical Errors Impact SEO

Technology evolves at a rapid rate, and since Google wants to present its users with the best user experience possible, if there are technical errors with your site (like broken plugins or links) it can negatively impact your SEO.

Our agency uses Google Search Console to uncover any technical errors with a site, such as 300, 400, and 500 pages, which are errors. Another thing we use Search Console for is checking to see if a site is getting indexed. If Google is not crawling your site, you’re not going to have good SEO.

Content Is King In SEO

Content is the backbone of SEO. Every time you write a new blog post, you are giving yourself a new page, which presents you with new keyword opportunities. People use Google to find the answers to their problems, and most times, blog posts are what appear in the search results. If you write unique blog posts regularly that have 300-500 words, internal and external links to relevant content, and well-placed keywords, you will see a boost in your SEO.

SEO Involves Updating Content

Google loves fresh content. Content that was published more recently ranks higher than content that is older. The reason for this is fresh content tends to be more accurate. To prevent your older pieces of content from dying off, we advise updating them. Do your research to include current and accurate information. Also, be mindful of the links in your posts. Are they outdated too?

Other things you should update are your meta titles, meta descriptions, and heading tags. You should update these three things on a six- to twelve-month basis depending on the results in your Google Analytics and Search Console.

SEO Is Also About Link Building

Although the landscape of SEO is always changing, having high-quality links link back to you has always been one of the major pillars of SEO. Link building is the process of acquiring high-quality websites to backlink to your site. Moz has described link building as “a vote of confidence about a page.” The theory is that when someone links to another website, the person is saying the website is a good resource.

You can build links by asking other websites in your industry to link back to you, or you can submit your site to relevant directories.

Contact Sperling Interactive at (978) 304-1730 to learn about our monthly SEO package and what else you can do to improve your site’s optimization.

How To Optimize For Voice Search

A smartphone opened up to Google.

 

 

 

 

 

Do you own a product by Google, Apple, or Amazon? If you’re like most, you probably own at least one tech product from one of these companies. Have you noticed any similarities between the devices made by these three companies? One feature you may have noticed is they all have voice assistants.Voice assistants, such as Siri, Alexa, Cortana, and Google Assistant, are changing the world, especially the SEO world.

The way people make searches online is changing. People are typing less and using their voice more – approximately 46% of US adults use a voice assistant device. As a result, the way we phrase our searches is changing. When a person uses their voice assistant, they perform a search query in the form of a question. So the way we are starting to access information is becoming more conversational. It’s something that businesses and nonprofits should begin taking into account. Here are our top tips on how to optimize your website for voice search.

Create specific web pages geared toward the questions people will ask their voice assistants.

You may already have town and city pages, which are specific web pages for the communities you service. They help you become more visible to those you wish to reach. To optimize your website for voice search, you should also create an FAQ page containing questions that people will commonly ask their voice assistant, with corresponding, informative answers to those questions. 

Claim your Google ‘My Business’ listing.

If you haven’t claimed your company’s Google listing, you should do so now. The ‘My Business’ listing gives Google and its users relevant information, such as your location, phone number, and hours of operation. Plus, Google loves it when you use its product. Another reason why you should do this is because 22% of searches these day are for local information and content.  

Use long-tail keywords.

Long-tail keywords are the three to four keywords related to the product or service that you’re selling. They tend to be very specific and, when people are using voice assistants, they tend to utilize long-tail keywords. Even if voice assistants weren’t revolutionizing our world, you should still use long-tail keyword as they’ve been known to increase sales.

Research.

Researching and brainstorming relevant keywords with your team is another way to optimize yourself for voice search. It can also help you find out what your competitors are doing.

Do you want to learn more ways on how to optimize yourself for the web? Call Sperling Interactive at (978) 304-1730 to see how your website is performing.

How To Understand Google Analytics

A finger pointing to the word, analytics.

 

 

 

 

 

In a blog post from earlier this month, we dissected Google Adwords. In today’s blog post, we are going to cover the traffic types by channel. On Google Analytics, you can measure how your marketing strategies are performing on social media platforms, search engines, emails, and third-party listing sites.

Organic Traffic – Traffic that comes through optimizing for search engines. This means any link that is clicked on search engine page results (SERP) that is not an ad (ads are marked with a little “ad” symbol). It can also be called “natural traffic.”

Direct Traffic – When someone types your URL directly into the search bar or has your URL (or a link on your site) saved as a bookmark.

Display Traffic – These are the display ads that show up when users visit a website outside of your own. Google has so much information that they have lists of specifically targeted users to whom you can show your ads. Display campaigns tend to have higher bounce rates, between 60-80%, since these are being shown on different sites and are when the user is not actively searching for your company or service.

Social – This is a section in Google Analytics that pools in traffic from all of your social sites. This does not include paid advertisements.

Facebook Advertising – This is traffic coming from our Facebook campaigns. You want to differentiate this traffic in Google Analytics so you can see the difference between Organic Facebook Traffic (natural clicks from your normal posts) and Paid Facebook Traffic (sponsored posts, campaigns etc.).

Paid Search – This traffic source is all paid search advertisements in Google, Bing, and other search engines. Paid search is one of the most important sources to track and optimize to ensure you are reaching the ROI you desire.

Referral – If you use a third-party listing site, any traffic driven to your website from these other sites are considered referral traffic. For instance, say you have a profile for your company on a site that lists other companies, such as Angie’s List, Home Advisor, etc., and someone clicks your website. This would be considered referral traffic.

At Sperling Interactive, we use Google Analytics to track how our clients’ online marketing strategies are performing. To learn how we can help you, call us at (978) 304-1730.

How To Tell You Have A Bad SEO Strategy

SEO Audit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you do your business’ SEO work, you’ll probably know by now that it’s complicated because it constantly changes. With that, it can be hard to tell if what you’re doing is helping or harming you. Today we’re covering four tell-tale signs you’re making bad SEO efforts for your business.

You’re not using specific keywords. You may think you know the keywords that apply to your business, but if you are putting in too general of keywords into your content, you’re not going to be found by the people hoping to discover your business. Get specific as possible with who you service and what you offer. Opt for long-tail keywords, which are longer, more specific keyword phrases. Long tail keywords get lower traffic, but will usually have a higher conversion rate as they are more specific. Long tail keywords should be utilized by companies that offer specialized products or services.

You’re applying black hat techniques instead of white hat techniques. Blackhat SEO techniques are techniques that focus on search engines instead of human interest. They include keyword stuffing, spammed blog posts, link farming (the creation of websites just to increase the popularity of a link), hidden content, and duplicate content. Blackhat techniques go against search engine guidelines and should not be practised. Instead, businesses should utilize white hat techniques, which obey search engine guideline and center on human interest. White hat techniques includes back linking, link building, using relevant keywords, and writing content for humans. White hat techniques will also provide users with the best user experience possible.

You’re not utilizing social media. If you haven’t created social media profiles for your business yet, then you need to hop on that now. Everybody is on it today and it can help improve your SEO because when people share your content it backlinks to your site. Additionally, more and more people are using social media to help them find services. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram are the most popular social media accounts, but don’t forget to post content to your Google + account as there are numerous opportunities to reach your audience there too.

You expect instant results. To get good SEO results, you need to be patient and evaluate your efforts. Compare your efforts to organic trends every now and then, research what competitors are doing, and analyze your data in Google Analytics and Google Search Console. Above all else, realize SEO  takes time and if you put in the work you will see improvement soon.  

WordPress Plugins To Boost Your SEO

WordPress SEO plugins

 

 

 

 

 

A common question businesses ask us is how they can improve their SEO. Besides posting relevant content to your website often, having a mobile-friendly site, and adding relevant keywords, another way you can boost your SEO is through SEO plugins. Since we primarily create custom websites through the content management system, WordPress, today we will be covering our favorite SEO WordPress plugins.

WordPress SEO by Yoast. This plugin is one of the most downloadable plugins of all time. Through this free plugin, you are able to add an SEO title, meta description, and meta keywords to each post and page of your site. You’re also able to include social sharing information. What’s great about SEO by Yoast is it does an analysis on your focus keywords, checks your word count, and evaluates your meta description, images, slug, links, and page title and you’re able to edit those bits easily.  

All in One SEO Pack. This plugin is the second most used SEO plugin on WordPress. Like Yoast, it is also user-friendly. All in One SEO Pack automatically optimizes the titles of your blog posts for search engines like Google.

Premium SEO Pack. This plugin is terrific with helping websites improve their internal link building as well as optimizing its images. It also has SERP tracker, a tool that tracks the search engine ranking for your keywords in a user-friendly dashboard.

SEO Professor. What makes SEO Professor stick out from the crowd is that it has a keyword research tool that helps you generate keywords for your content. When you are done with a post, it gives you a score. It also checks your images to ensure you have all the right tags and makes suggestions.

SEO Ultimate. SEO Ultimate is another popular SEO WordPress plugin. This plugin is great because it has editing tools like tag rewriter and meta description editor, which are helpful. It also has a nifty 404 monitor that redirects visitors on pages not found.

Have you ever wanted an SEO audit on your website? Call Sperling Interactive for a free audit.

4 Ways To Optimize Your Images


Your written content isn’t the only way you can improve your business’ SEO. Your images are another component to your online presence that you should be optimizing as well. Here are four things you should do to your images before you update or redesign your website.

Name your photos. When you upload your photos to Media Library, they will have the filename that they had when they were saved to your computer. To optimize the photos, change the name by using relevant keywords.

Include alt tags. An alt tag is the text that displays when an image doesn’t load. It’s also the text that may be read to a visitor who is blind or visually impaired. Alt tags are also the keywords Google reads to know more about the page since it can’t read photos. You can add alt tags to your photos through the Media Library once they are uploaded. Like the name of the photo, the alt tag should be descriptive.

Keep your photo size small. The size of your image does affect your site’s loading speed. You wouldn’t want to lose potential clients because of this.

Consider your image file type. The three most common image file types are JPEGs, GIFs, and PNGs.

JPEGs- They are the most common of the image file types and are supported nearly everywhere. With JPEGs, you can expect millions of colors and the ability to adjust the file size as well as image quality.

GIFS- You probably know GIFs as the file type that supports animated memes. It’s the oldest file type and can handle transparency. Because GIFs are limited to 256 colors, they are recommended for company logos instead of real photographs.

PNGs- PNGs are the newest of image file types and are considered the replacement for GIFs. Like GIFs, they support transparency, but what sets PNGs apart is they offer millions of colors. Important to note: this file format is supported everywhere.

How To Write A Meta Description


 

 

 

 

 

Meta descriptions, also known as snippets, are the characters you see under URL titles. They inform potential visitors what to expect when they click onto your webpage. Meta descriptions are essentially virtual salespeople for your business and its online posts, so creating effective ones will impact whether or not your company stands out from the crowd.

Don’t exceed 160 characters. Like Twitter, meta descriptions have a character limit. The character limit is 160, including spaces, so it’s important to keep that character amount under the limit so search engines don’t cut them.

Include keywords from the title of the webpage. Keywords are the words people search when looking for your business or content. Keywords are crucial to digital marketing. When you include keywords, search engines will highlight them, catching the eye of the searcher.

Don’t make it clickbait. As tempting as it is to write a juicy description, if your meta description doesn’t authentically convey the page visitors will land on, people will lose trust in your business.

Utilize Yoast SEO. If your business uses WordPress, you should consider downloading the plugin, Yoast SEO. It grades your web content on its readability, focus keywords, and meta description.

Don’t forget to write one. Meta descriptions are advertising copy. When you neglect to write one, you’re neglecting search marketing. Additionally, when you don’t write one, search engines will take a snippet  from the first paragraph on the page.