What Is Inbound Marketing?

You have probably heard the term ‘inbound marketing’ before. It has become quite the buzzword, and right now it is the future of marketing. 

How Inbound Marketing Differs From Outbound Marketing 

Inbound marketing is the process of attracting prospects to your business’s products or services through content that educates and delights. Inbound marketing is an online marketing strategy that entails your website, blog, social media, email marketing efforts, etc. 

Outbound marketing is often viewed as traditional marketing. Tactics for outbound marketing include telemarketing, radio/TV, trade shows, seminars, emails to purchased lists etc. 

Why Outbound Marketing Is Becoming Less Effective 

Outbound marketing is called outbound because it is all about pushing your message out there in the hopes of it resonating. Over time, this strategy has become less effective. As this article from Hubspot states, because people are becoming more and more inundated with outbound marketing efforts, they are starting to utilize ways to block them out like caller ID, spam filtering, and Sirius satellite radio. 

Outbound has a low ROI because it targets everyone and anyone. Inbound targets the right type of traffic to your brand. You attract these people by knowing and understanding your ideal buyers. 

Why Inbound Marketing Is The Future

As we noted above, inbound marketing requires the Internet, and as a society we are using the Internet now more than ever before. An estimated 1.92 billion people are expected to purchase something online in 2019

The Internet provides buyers with instant information gratification. They can learn just about anything there is to know about a brand from their pricing and reviews to their turnaround on delivery and staff in just a few clicks. 

Another reason why inbound marketing is the future is customer buyer behavior is changing. Brand trust has never been more important. Due to the Internet, consumers have more options than ever before and they can also compare those options. 

Due to the political climate, people also caring more about authenticity and integrity from brands.  As this article from Crowdspring states, millennials in particular have a deep distrust of traditional advertising. A study found that only 1% of the millennials polled would trust a brand because of their advertising. This generation alone is one reason why outbound marketing is becoming less popular. 

The Different Types Of Inbound Marketing 

There is no single inbound marketing tactic that works well on its own. While we rely on SEO to draw visitors from an organic search, SEO doesn’t work if there’s no content on a site. Without social media promotion, blogs don’t reach interested people. 

Inbound marketing is about targeting verses advertising to the masses. In inbound marketing, the mission is to represent customers and be found verses representing a company and finding customers. It’s 1:1 targeting verses mass advertising. 

Although it varies greatly from business to business, these days buyers might be anywhere from two-thirds to 90% of the way through their journey before they before they engage with a vendor’s sales rep. In inbound-marketing, efforts build upon themselves over time. 

To wrap things up here’s why inbound marketing works: 

  • It Increases Brand Awareness 
  • Puts Customers In the Driver’s Seat
  • Is Fact-Based Over Intuitive-Based 
  • Improves SEO


At its core, inbound marketing is curating a strategic content strategy tailored for each stage of the buyer’s journey. By doing so, you are providing valuable content towards each specific user. 

At Sperling Interactive we offer search engine optimization, search engine marketing, social media, blogging, and email marketing. We work hard to implement inbound marketing for each of these services for each of our clients.  To speak with us, call (978) 304-1730. 

How To Create An Effective Facebook Business Page

Scrabble tiles on a table that spell out 'Facebook.'

Facebook may not be the youngest social media platform out there, but it is still the king with 2.41 billion monthly active users. Despite the controversies the company dealt with last year, it is clear with that stat Facebook is not going anywhere soon.

Facebook isn’t just a place for you to see what is going on with your friends and family; it is an invaluable tool for brands to interact with their audience, and we still find there are a lot of small businesses out there that don’t have a business Facebook business page. For those who haven’t set one up yet, today we’ll be exploring how to create an effective Facebook business page.

Create A Business Page, Not A Profile

While a Facebook business page looks like a regular profile, it is different. For one, it has business tools like Facebook advertising and analytics/insights. 

Another reason why your business shouldn’t have a regular profile is people can’t ‘like’ you. They have to ‘friend’ you.

Thirdly, it’s a policy on Facebook’s terms of services that you can’t use a personal account to represent something other than a person. If you’ve been posting content for your business under a profile, here’s how to convert to business Facebook page. Here’s how to convert your profile to a page.

Claim Your Page’s URL

Upon creating your page, Facebook will assign a long number to your page’s URL. To make your page easier to share and find, be sure to customize the URL with your organization’s name. Here’s how to change your Facebook page URL.

Have A Captivating Cover Photo

Facebook lets you upload a unique cover photo for your business page. The desktop dimensions for a cover photo is 820 pixels wide by 312 pixels tall and the dimensions, for a mobile device it’s 640 pixels wide by 360 pixels tall. A cover photo can be an image, graphic, or a video. Regardless of what you choose, your cover photo should be branded and represent your business. Even though your cover photo is bigger than your profile picture, don’t upload a cover photo that has too much text or clutter.

Choose An Appropriate Profile Picture

Your profile picture is one of the most important aspects of your Facebook business page so choose your image appropriately. It’s your thumbnail image after all. Most businesses opt for their logo, which we would also recommend. If you’re a solopreneur or consultant, you may want to go with a professional head shot since you’re  the face of their business. The minimum dimensions for a Facebook profile picture is 180 pixels x 180 pixels.

Optimize Your About Section

Your About section is the one first places people go to learn more about your business. Do a thorough job with the About section page. You want people to feel like they know what your business is about and who it’s for. Take your time filling out your description ( you have 155 characters maximum), categories, contact information, location, hours, and pricing.

Add Milestones

The milestones feature allows you to highlight some of your biggest business accomplishment like awards won, product released, and other major events. Be sure to add your milestones to your about section.

Earn The Very Responsive Badge

If you respond quickly to messages, Facebook can reward you with a badge that reads ‘responds very quickly to messages’ below your cover photo. You earn that badge if your response rate is 90% or if you have responded to messages within 15 minutes over the last seven days. If you’re not responsive with messages, don’t worry, nothing will appear.

Post At YOUR Optimal Times

As we noted above, Facebook business pages come with some handy business tools like analytics/insights. Be sure to look at your insights every week to not only get insights into what content to post, but to learn when is the most optimal time to post for your audience. 

Have Facebook Friends Like The Page

The best place to get your first fans is by inviting your friends and family on Facebook to like your page. They’re already fans of you as an individual so they’re bound to want to engage with your business.

Promote Your Facebook Page On Your Website & Email Signature

To acquire even more fans, we recommend promoting your Facebook business page on your website and email signature.

Always Use Images In Posts

Images make a big difference in an overcrowded social media feed. Visuals attracts followers, engage followers, and makes your post all that more memorable.

Boost Posts That Get The Most Engagement

To make the most of your content that gets the most engagement, boost those posts. Boosting ensures a post will appear in front of a larger audience that isn’t following you but it bound to like your content due to their demographics and/or interests.

If you don’t have a Facebook business page and would like help making one that delights, contact us today at (978) 304-1730. At Sperling Interactive, we’re experts at social media strategy.

Non-Keyword Related Things That Hurt SEO

A graphic of a smartphone and laptop with with analytics on their screens.

For many non-search engine marketing professionals, they’re often told keywords are the most important component of SEO. But over recent years, having a website that offers a positive user experience has been proven to be more important than relevant keywords. There are many things that impact positive user experience and below are twelve things that hurt SEO.

The Site Isn’t ADA Compliant

ADA stands for The Americans with Disabilities Act. The act was established in 1990 and it prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including the Internet. 

For a website to be ADA compliant, people with disabilities must be able to read and understand the content on the site. This means a transcript for audio-only media and closed captions on videos. Website ADA compliance also includes page contrast, the placing of descriptive text behind images, and organizing the site in a way that is easy for screen readers to access the content in a logical way. A site that isn’t ADA compliant hurts SEO because the site isn’t accessible to everyone.

If you want to learn more about ADA compliance, be sure to check out the seminar we are presenting in October at the Enterprise Center.

There’s No Blog Or Blog Posts

A blog is another thing that provides sites with a positive user experience and by not having one can it can hurt SEO. 

Blogs provide  positive user experience because they help build brand trust. Regular blog posts give sites fresh content, and by not utilizing one, it can give users the impression your site hasn’t been updated in a long time. 

Another way blogs improve SEO is you’re able to rank for long-tail keywords. Longer, more specific keywords are good for businesses that are small and have big name brands as competitors. Half of all searches are for terms that are four words or longer.

Thirdly, a quality blog gives sites more reasons to link back to your site.

No Social Media Posts

Just like with blogging, by not being active with social media you are hurting your SEO. An active and engaged social media presence sends search engines the signal you have good authority. Additionally, social sharing drives traffic to your website and social media profiles rank in search engines.

Slow Page Speed

With positive user experience in mind, slow page speed greatly hurts SEO. In today’s instant gratification world, people are impatient and want information fast. A slow page speed also means search engines can’t crawl as many pages.

Technical Errors

Technical errors like broken links and missing pages hurt SEO. You don’t want people coming to your site only to find the thing they need is broken.  You can use Google Search Console to see if there are any technical issues with your site.

No SSL Certificate  

Naturally, Google prefers sending users to trusted sites. Standing for secure sockets layer, an SSL certificate creates higher consumer confidence and encrypts form data. You can tell your site has an SSL certificate by looking up at your address box and seeing if you have ‘https’ in your URL. Last year, Google started labeling HTTP sites as “not secure.”

Spam Comments

Spam comments are something every blog deals with, and unfortunately it can hurt SEO. Spam comments hurt SEO because Google considers where your site links to as a strong indication of what kind of site you are. The comments discredit you and impact your site’s authority. Be sure to always monitor your comments so you can avoid looking spammy. And remember, it’s your site and you can decide whether those comments appear. 

Poor Spelling & Grammar

You know how you can tell you’ve received a spam email by its poor spelling and grammar alone, well search engines are also wary of sites with these mistakes. According to Search Engine Land, sites with higher ranked pages tend to have less spelling mistakes and grammatical errors than lower ranked sites.

Too Many Page Links

Pages with too many links are not user-friendly. When you have too many links, you give Google the impression your content isn’t valuable and you’re trying to stir users to somewhere else. Always make sure your links are relevant and are not going to distract users from the content on the original page.

Duplicate Content

Google loves original content and sees duplicate content as a shortcut. When updating your site or adding new pages, double check that a significant amount of content is not anywhere else on your site. If you have some duplicate content on your website because it is useful for users, put ‘no index’ or ‘no follow’ on those pages so that they don’t hurt your SEO.

At Sperling Interactive, all of our work is aimed at creating positive user experiences. Whether we built your website or not, we can optimize your site for search engines and provide positive user experiences. To learn more about the work we do, give us a call at (978) 304-1730.

How To Optimize Your Landing Page

I spoke to a colleague recently that works for a corporate company as a loan originator. They mentioned having a landing page through their company and were looking for ways to better optimize their page, both from a conversion perspective and an SEO perspective. In today’s blog post, we’ll be breaking down what a landing page is, what  landing page optimization is, and how to optimize your landing page for both conversions and SEO.

What Is A Landing Page?

Sometimes referred to as a capture page, destination page, or a static page, a landing page is a standalone page web users are brought to after clicking on a search result, online ad, or the link in an eblast, newsletter, or social media post. Landing pages educate, encourage, and attract. Lead generation is the most common goal of a landing page.

Below are screenshots of landing pages we’ve created.

The landing page for Destination Salem's free travel guides.

The Cape Cod landing page for SunPower by BlueSel.

 

The contact section from BlueSel's landing page.

 

A landing page for the nonprofit, Bridgewell.

 

The section of Bridgwell's landing page that describes their services.

 

The 'Request More Information' section from Bridgewell's landing page.

 

The landing page for Be Better Now.

 

The testimonial and special offer from the Be Better Now landing page.  

What Is Landing Page Optimization? 

Landing page optimization is the process of enhancing or improving each element on your landing page to increase conversions and improve SEO. The biggest reason why landing pages fail is they don’t meet their audience’s needs. Unintuitive design, non-descriptive or misleading headlines, unrecognizable calls-to-action are all contributing factors. 

To work effectively, landing pages need to be curated for a specific audience and have a clear call-to-action. In today’s digital world, landing pages are often the first exchange people have with a business. They most often offer users something in return for their contact information, and we highly recommend businesses apply that to theirs to offer value. These offers are usually ebooks, subscription to the organization’s newsletter, or a free trial of a product.

If a landing page is meant to be read or convert, a good bounce rate is 60%-80%. If your goal is to drive traffic or have the user visit multiple web pages, a healthy bounce rate would be between 30%-60%.

Optimized landing pages can improve the overall ranking of the website they are on and can give more insights to Google on what your organization is about.

How To Optimize Landing Pages For Conversions 

Use Your Data

As we said before, the biggest reason why landing pages flop is they fail to meet their target audience’s needs. Design your landing pages based on the information you already have about your audience. Be sure to use the information you have of your audience from your website. It’s important to note that you make the most improvements to your landing pages by pushing them live and then making tweaks as insights and data come in about your audience.

Limit the Number of Calls-To-Actions 

You don’t want to overwhelm web users. Stick with one call-to-action and keep your text limited. People only read 20% of the content on a webpage so long sentences and paragraphs don’t work well. Just have the bare necessities.

Have Consistency

You need to make sure the messaging, design, and tone matches the search result, ad, social media post, or newsletter that brings visitors to the landing page. You want your page to match the expectations the visitor had based on their previous interaction.

Write A Catchy Headline

The amount of time it takes you to create a landing page is the amount of time it  should take you to think about the headline. Your headline is just as important, if not more important, than your landing page itself. Because no one’s going to click to your page if there’s no incentive to leave the page they are on. 

Keep The Most Important Information Above The Fold

The term ‘above the fold’ comes from the newspaper world. Digital folds are the points at which the user must scroll to gain more information.

Put In Testimonials

Testimonials help build trust. They are proof people love your business and they can also let visitors determine if they are the right fit to work with you.

How To Optimize Landing Pages For SEO

Have A Custom URL

A custom URL containing certain keywords can make the page more alluring for search engines. Make sure the main keyword for your page is in your URL.

Determine Relevant Keywords

Keywords are the words that you want search engines to rank your page for. You can do a Google search or use Search Console to determine the best keyword for your landing page.

Strategically Place Your Keywords

Once you determine your keywords, you’re going to want to place them strategically on your landing page. The areas you should consider are title tags, meta description, and your copy.

Have A Fast Page

Page speed has never been more important. We see fast page speed as one of the six pillars that makes up SEO. People will X out of your landing page fast if the page load is slow.

Don’t Do Once & Forget


SEO requires ongoing work. Check out this blog post we published back in May to learn why. As such, you want to make sure you use Google Analytics and Google Search Console once a month to see how your landing page is performing and how it can be better optimized. These two tools can inform you what people are searching for to find your landing page, how long users stay on the page, and if there are any technical issues with the page that need fixing.

At Sperling Interactive, we are masters at crafting optimized landing pages for conversions and SEO. We’d be happy to perform an audit of your landing page and give you feedback on how to improve it. We can also create a landing page for you and run a campaign around it. Give us a call at (978) 304-1730 to learn more about us and how we can serve you.